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Another V10 Preview

Tone Seeker

Power User
Multi-point Iterative Matching Technology (MIMT) extracts pertinent data from various points in the amp's circuitry to correct the model. <snip>

The advantage to this multi-point approach is that we correct the model at various points in the circuit rather than just doing a match on the output.

This has the effect of making the models extremely accurate across all possible settings of the various controls <snip>

Fascinating. . . I've always appreciated the technical background that you share on occasion.

Thanks Cliff.

Terry.
 

romanianreaper

Power User
This is unbelievable.

I think I just might have to call in sick the day after v10.00 comes out.

LOL!

I think Cliff is really on to something here. I was reading his explanation in this thread and although I don't know alot about the insides of a real amp, it makes so much sense. It seems almost like having video instead of a photograph, able to get every detail on what you are seeing (in this case hearing).

The Axe-FXII is already unbelievable but to be able to pin down additional "mistakes" will just get everything sounding even closer. Good stuff!
 

babuka

Inspired
The knobs have always matched. Multi-point Iterative Matching Technology (MIMT) extracts pertinent data from various points in the amp's circuitry to correct the model. A model can deviate from the actual amp due to parasitics, i.e. coupling between various points in the circuit, through the chassis, etc. as well as non-ideal behavior of transformers and other components. It is impossible to predict the deviations since they are not "designed in" and are not reflected in the schematic. In some cases these "imperfections" are happy accidents and give an amp it's character. Older amps, with their point-to-point wiring, are especially susceptible to this although I'm seeing it in some modern amps too.

The advantage to this multi-point approach is that we correct the model at various points in the circuit rather than just doing a match on the output.

This has the effect of making the models extremely accurate across all possible settings of the various controls (I'm actually laughing here at times that the controls track so well). The difference tends to be subtle in many cases but it is audible and, after all, we are striving for perfection. Another advantage is that it cleans up mistakes in the model so if a value was entered incorrectly, MIMT will correct the mistake automatically. Furthermore, the matching data makes it easier to find mistakes since I plot the data prior to saving and embedding and if the data indicates significant deviation then I know something is incorrect. For example, I have found at least 10 mistakes in the last two days. That 65 Bassman model was way off. The MIMT data showed significant deviations so I knew something was wrong. Turns out I had the Tone Stack Frequency multiplier set to 4.0 (should be 1.0) so the tone stack was off by a factor of four.

Thanks for the detailed response. I understand completely what you are doing. How are you going to handle these updates with the amps you may no longer have in your possession that you modeled in the past?
 

Robboman

Fractal Fanatic
Cliff, thanks for dumbing it down enough for even me to begin understanding where you are going with this. Seriously intriguing and impressive stuff! 'Wow' doesn't quite express it.
 

bammbamm

Experienced
Thanks for the detailed response. I understand completely what you are doing. How are you going to handle these updates with the amps you may no longer have in your possession that you modeled in the past?

Ancient Chinese Secret?
 

xpenno

Power User
The knobs have always matched. Multi-point Iterative Matching Technology (MIMT) extracts pertinent data from various points in the amp's circuitry to correct the model. A model can deviate from the actual amp due to parasitics, i.e. coupling between various points in the circuit, through the chassis, etc. as well as non-ideal behavior of transformers and other components. It is impossible to predict the deviations since they are not "designed in" and are not reflected in the schematic. In some cases these "imperfections" are happy accidents and give an amp it's character. Older amps, with their point-to-point wiring, are especially susceptible to this although I'm seeing it in some modern amps too.

The advantage to this multi-point approach is that we correct the model at various points in the circuit rather than just doing a match on the output.

This has the effect of making the models extremely accurate across all possible settings of the various controls (I'm actually laughing here at times that the controls track so well). The difference tends to be subtle in many cases but it is audible and, after all, we are striving for perfection. Another advantage is that it cleans up mistakes in the model so if a value was entered incorrectly, MIMT will correct the mistake automatically. Furthermore, the matching data makes it easier to find mistakes since I plot the data prior to saving and embedding and if the data indicates significant deviation then I know something is incorrect. For example, I have found at least 10 mistakes in the last two days. That 65 Bassman model was way off. The MIMT data showed significant deviations so I knew something was wrong. Turns out I had the Tone Stack Frequency multiplier set to 4.0 (should be 1.0) so the tone stack was off by a factor of four.

If only there weren't so many amps in there then maybe we could get this update quicker :mrgreen

Just kidding obviously, this sounds amazing, the clips sound great but this explanation of what's going on in the new process really makes sense, can't wait for it to drop!!!

Spence
 

Randalljax

Fractal Fanatic
Question ,Cliff

not sure if you will answer but based on what MIMT is telling you .which of the models were the farthest off, any of the hi gainers??
This almost sounds like what dorothy was to the team in the Twister movie .sounds like you got her to fly
 

Kriig

Fractal Fanatic
The knobs have always matched. Multi-point Iterative Matching Technology (MIMT) extracts pertinent data from various points in the amp's circuitry to correct the model. A model can deviate from the actual amp due to parasitics, i.e. coupling between various points in the circuit, through the chassis, etc. as well as non-ideal behavior of transformers and other components. It is impossible to predict the deviations since they are not "designed in" and are not reflected in the schematic. In some cases these "imperfections" are happy accidents and give an amp it's character. Older amps, with their point-to-point wiring, are especially susceptible to this although I'm seeing it in some modern amps too.

The advantage to this multi-point approach is that we correct the model at various points in the circuit rather than just doing a match on the output.

This has the effect of making the models extremely accurate across all possible settings of the various controls (I'm actually laughing here at times that the controls track so well). The difference tends to be subtle in many cases but it is audible and, after all, we are striving for perfection. Another advantage is that it cleans up mistakes in the model so if a value was entered incorrectly, MIMT will correct the mistake automatically. Furthermore, the matching data makes it easier to find mistakes since I plot the data prior to saving and embedding and if the data indicates significant deviation then I know something is incorrect. For example, I have found at least 10 mistakes in the last two days. That 65 Bassman model was way off. The MIMT data showed significant deviations so I knew something was wrong. Turns out I had the Tone Stack Frequency multiplier set to 4.0 (should be 1.0) so the tone stack was off by a factor of four.

And i thank you in my mind every time i hit a string. Mindblowing.
 
S

Soultrash

Guest
so now we can go from clean to extreme death metal by just adjusting the vol knob...yaaay ;)
 

wtfover

Inspired
Thanks for the detailed information. This certainly sounds like quite the breakthrough, to say the least!
 

Gorilla

Experienced
The knobs have always matched. Multi-point Iterative Matching Technology (MIMT) extracts pertinent data from various points in the amp's circuitry to correct the model. A model can deviate from the actual amp due to parasitics, i.e. coupling between various points in the circuit, through the chassis, etc. as well as non-ideal behavior of transformers and other components. It is impossible to predict the deviations since they are not "designed in" and are not reflected in the schematic. In some cases these "imperfections" are happy accidents and give an amp it's character. Older amps, with their point-to-point wiring, are especially susceptible to this although I'm seeing it in some modern amps too.

The advantage to this multi-point approach is that we correct the model at various points in the circuit rather than just doing a match on the output.

This has the effect of making the models extremely accurate across all possible settings of the various controls (I'm actually laughing here at times that the controls track so well). The difference tends to be subtle in many cases but it is audible and, after all, we are striving for perfection. Another advantage is that it cleans up mistakes in the model so if a value was entered incorrectly, MIMT will correct the mistake automatically. Furthermore, the matching data makes it easier to find mistakes since I plot the data prior to saving and embedding and if the data indicates significant deviation then I know something is incorrect. For example, I have found at least 10 mistakes in the last two days. That 65 Bassman model was way off. The MIMT data showed significant deviations so I knew something was wrong. Turns out I had the Tone Stack Frequency multiplier set to 4.0 (should be 1.0) so the tone stack was off by a factor of four.

hahahahaha.... anyways, COOL!
 
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