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Amp in the Room?

bshaw92

Experienced
I'm with you. Wasn't implying you didn't. You noted it - I just tagged on to the last post, which was yours so it could be followed.
 

Roby Rocks

Inspired
Vendor
Roby, this sounded really good...and close !!! I guess this is so there is no mic capture, reverb from room ? A direct AMP ?
Can FAS make a Block that accomplishes this in one swoop ?
Obviously the sound is taken directly from axe. No mic. No real room reverb. Single block? Use Cab Block! 😅
 

guitarmike

Experienced
If one can't hear the difference between Filter+EQ and an IR, one shouldn't have gotten an Axe-Fx in the first place.
With the wide variety of ir's out there, some of which are completely unusable imho, I bet I could play you ten different ir's with one being a simple eq with tweaks, and you wouldn't be able to tell me which one it is.
 

Jupiter

Inspired
@FractalAudio / Cliff, I just wanted to say, THANK YOU!!!

I just tried your settings (everything identical, just for the laughs and giggles) on my AxeFx2 (in my living room, with my Strats, a humble EHX Caliber 22 and a Marshall 1912 cab with an Eminence Delta Pro 12A, TV level volumes, totally clean sounds) and WOW, no, I mean WOOOOOOOOW!!! The only difference is I use a mixer block to mix the Filter+PEQ and the direct signal from the Amp block together and wow...

Honestly, in my almost 9 year tenure with the AF2 I never had any complaints about the amp in the room sound and feeling but honestly I wish I knew that "trick" several years ago!!!
 
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SacredGroove

Inspired
Cliff,
After two years and multiple major updates, would you have any suggestions/changes to your original post?
I think it will come down to the FR speakers you're using. The ones I'm using have a spike in the 10kHz range, so my settings, personal preference or not, will be different than yours, and Cliff's original settings.

To experiment further, I am going to leave the Amp block EQ at stock settings and set the Filter block LPF to taste. Afterward, I should be able to tweak either of those blocks to fine tune the tone.
 

m lebofsky

Experienced
I think it will come down to the FR speakers you're using. The ones I'm using have a spike in the 10kHz range, so my settings, personal preference or not, will be different than yours, and Cliff's original settings.

To experiment further, I am going to leave the Amp block EQ at stock settings and set the Filter block LPF to taste. Afterward, I should be able to tweak either of those blocks to fine tune the tone.
Yes. I do not disagree with anything you said, but I was wondering what Cliff's thoughts are 2 years later.
 
Try this:
Make a patch with no cab block.
After the amp put a Filter block. Reset to make sure all parameters are at default values.
Set the type to Lowpass.
Set the Order to 4th.
Set the Freq to ~5000.
Set the High Cut Freq to ~5000.

Adjust the Freq and High Cut Freq to taste. For more aggressive tones increase both to 6000 or so. For warmer tones decrease both to 4000 or so.

Now, to add some "character" put a Graphic EQ or Parametric EQ block after (or before) the Filter block. Boost 125 Hz a little. Play around with some of the midrange and upper midrange bands to change the character of the tone. This is what I used:
31: 0.0
63 Hz: 0.6
125 Hz: 4.57
250 Hz: 0.25
500: 0.0
1K: -5.0
2K: -2.27
4K: 1.95
8K: -1.0
16K: -5.77

The reasoning behind this is that there is no such thing as a "flat" speaker. All speakers, even really expensive monitors have peaks and dips in the response. That's why they all sound different. The primary thing a guitar speaker does is roll off the highs aggressively at somewhere between 4K and 6K Hz. The Filter block replicates the rolloff but lets the natural response of the speaker come through.
I know it's an old post, but it is still actual. I own a real Savage 60 amp and an engl4x12 cab with V30. I also have the FM3 and Matrix gt1000. But the FM3 never sounded like the real deal. I tried impedance curves, different settings, even the trick with the matrix on 2 o'clocl and nothing helped. But the GEQ from these settings brought the FM3 to the point, where it sounds damn close! I just fine tuned the EQ and set it as global on OUT2. With this, I can dial in any amp and it will sound great and realistic. I think, that people are expecting a modeller to sound soft and nice with rounded top end. So the FM3 delivers it. But that's not how a valve amp sounds like and then they complain .... It doesn't cut in the mix, it doesn't sound like an amp in the room etc. Thx for this post!
 

flageolet

Member
Exited to try this. Did it once with the ultra, but that was with headphones. With the axefx ll, i m running through a matrix and a 4x12, but still need to do too much to the high end to get a bit of the punch and treble needed to cut through the other valve monsters in the band.
Don t really understand why it is necessary, as i m only simulating pre and poweramp but what do i know 😜.

Can t wait to try this weekend. Damn lockdown (or better: damn virus)
 

Pagzy

Member
Try this:
Make a patch with no cab block.
After the amp put a Filter block. Reset to make sure all parameters are at default values.
Set the type to Lowpass.
Set the Order to 4th.
Set the Freq to ~5000.
Set the High Cut Freq to ~5000.

Adjust the Freq and High Cut Freq to taste. For more aggressive tones increase both to 6000 or so. For warmer tones decrease both to 4000 or so.

Now, to add some "character" put a Graphic EQ or Parametric EQ block after (or before) the Filter block. Boost 125 Hz a little. Play around with some of the midrange and upper midrange bands to change the character of the tone. This is what I used:
31: 0.0
63 Hz: 0.6
125 Hz: 4.57
250 Hz: 0.25
500: 0.0
1K: -5.0
2K: -2.27
4K: 1.95
8K: -1.0
16K: -5.77

The reasoning behind this is that there is no such thing as a "flat" speaker. All speakers, even really expensive monitors have peaks and dips in the response. That's why they all sound different. The primary thing a guitar speaker does is roll off the highs aggressively at somewhere between 4K and 6K Hz. The Filter block replicates the rolloff but lets the natural response of the speaker come through.
@FractalAudio I have been meaning to try this out for years, man I think I have a new favourite sound with the USA IIC++ I was struggling to dial in with cabs. In fact it was quite easy to dial in this way and it probably sounds better to me than everything other high gain sound I've created before... and with no drive pedal in front of it! Can't stop chuggin' 🤘
 
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