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Am I setting my Axe-Fx up wrong, or is something wrong?

666was999

Fractal Fanatic
Havent read through the thread but listened to your clip. The guitar sends too much lows, so the amp is drowning in them and eats the attacks.
Take some lows off, input page of the amp block, or use a leading eq before the block. Then add back lows with a post amp eq. That should fix it.
 

Carlswe

Member
Havent read through the thread but listened to your clip. The guitar sends too much lows, so the amp is drowning in them and eats the attacks.
Take some lows off, input page of the amp block, or use a leading eq before the block. Then add back lows with a post amp eq. That should fix it.

Well.. One year.. And this is the solution.. Boy do I feel silly now.. Thanks 6. And everyone else! :D :oops::rolleyes:
 

Carlswe

Member
I think I am having the same problem - could you please post the patch with the fix? Thank you

Well, the thing is this applies to all presets using my PRS. What I do is go to the amp block, input EQ and roll the low cut until it removes the flubbyness from the bass. All that is left is chug and separation, not overly fed by the bassy input from my PRS. It really helps to use the looper and palm mute some chords, and adjust as it plays.

I think that I just wanted it to sound good, like, it's a high end guitar, I just wanted it to be great without adjusting much.

I started making presets for my specific guitars, like "Recto PRS", "JVM Aristides" and so forth, applying this trick to everything. It cleans things up and shines. You would think that it would have struck me as chords using only the EBGD strings sounded good, and anything with A och (drop) D didn't.
 

yyz67

Power User
Well.. One year.. And this is the solution.

What I do is go to the amp block, input EQ and roll the low cut until it removes the flubbyness from the bass.

Good to hear. Confirms that the guitar (pickups/wood) is tone determinant #1.

I tend not to dig many of the factory presets with my LTD EC-1000 as they tend to sound muffled (~boring) to my ear. Tweaking amp tone (e.g. bass, treble, bright), decreasing sag, and also reducing speaker drive/compression/compliance (down/off) clarifies and livens the tone for me. Also adding some dynamic presence can be really nice to get dynamic clarity.
 

xarkon

Inspired
Well, the thing is this applies to all presets using my PRS. What I do is go to the amp block, input EQ and roll the low cut until it removes the flubbyness from the bass. All that is left is chug and separation, not overly fed by the bassy input from my PRS. It really helps to use the looper and palm mute some chords, and adjust as it plays.

I think that I just wanted it to sound good, like, it's a high end guitar, I just wanted it to be great without adjusting much.

I started making presets for my specific guitars, like "Recto PRS", "JVM Aristides" and so forth, applying this trick to everything. It cleans things up and shines. You would think that it would have struck me as chords using only the EBGD strings sounded good, and anything with A och (drop) D didn't.

It might have been mentioned in this thread before, but this problem exists in real amp land, too, with the Mesa Mark series being a prime example. To achieve a tight sound on those amps, a common approach is to set bass around 2 or 3 on the channel, then add it back using the graphic EQ. The same thing works in the Mesa Mark models in the Axe.
 

Carlswe

Member
It might have been mentioned in this thread before, but this problem exists in real amp land, too, with the Mesa Mark series being a prime example. To achieve a tight sound on those amps, a common approach is to set bass around 2 or 3 on the channel, then add it back using the graphic EQ. The same thing works in the Mesa Mark models in the Axe.

Yes, I have actually owned two Mark IV, and when dialed in right the absolutely scream. I have had a cpl of rectos and a roadster aswell, huge Mesa Boogie fan. I mostly played Les Pauls at the time, so I have learnt a lot about my PRS during the last week :)
 

Jason Scott

Fractal Fanatic
I think that I just wanted it to sound good, like, it's a high end guitar, I just wanted it to be great without adjusting much.

I have a couple of DI guitar tracks from Ola that I downloaded a year or two ago. When I was reamping your guitar tracks, I also reamped those and compared them using the same preset. Other than the low-end differences, they sounded almost identical. Once I adjusted the Input EQ Low Cut, I'd bet you couldn't tell them apart. Point is, I don't know what Ola's done to get the sound out of the guitar he's using in the "Will It Chug" video you posted, but I seriously doubt it's stock. It's certainly not representative of the sound I think most people are getting from their guitars, so you're in good company.
 
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666was999

Fractal Fanatic
Usually all amps got their sound taylored from the manufacturer with a strat or a paula in mind.
When you use something else it's no surprise you have to correct.

Also dom't forget that many celeb guitar players modded stuff and tried an endless number of gear until they came to their combinations, that they rely on from a certain time and use from then on. Some modded their amps, some their guitars and some both.
There's nothing wrong with turning knobs and searching for tone. That is all normal.
 
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