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AITR

TSJMajesty

Power User
Don't forget that the isolated guitar tracks are often/usually/mostly post-mix. Meaning what is isolated is the sound after the engineer has worked his craft, chopping here, boosting there, etc. This has then little to do with the original tone of the guitar as it sounded coming out of the amp.

So when you "tone-match" an isolated track and say "that's what the original sounds like" well, no, not really. That's what worked in the mix with that specific bass track, these drums, those strings and synths, etc.
 

fremen

Fractal Fanatic
Vendor
Don't forget that the isolated guitar tracks are often/usually/mostly post-mix. Meaning what is isolated is the sound after the engineer has worked his craft, chopping here, boosting there, etc. This has then little to do with the original tone of the guitar as it sounded coming out of the amp.

So when you "tone-match" an isolated track and say "that's what the original sounds like" well, no, not really. That's what worked in the mix with that specific bass track, these drums, those strings and synths, etc.
This. And this is why chasing exact tones from recordings is not a good idea, imho. What works within a specific mix is made to work FOR this mix. If you play in a cover band and want to have the exact guitar sound for each song you cover (from different bands), you'll be the FOH engineer worst nightmare.
 

la noise

Power User
Don't forget that the isolated guitar tracks are often/usually/mostly post-mix. Meaning what is isolated is the sound after the engineer has worked his craft, chopping here, boosting there, etc. This has then little to do with the original tone of the guitar as it sounded coming out of the amp.

Excellent point!
 

la noise

Power User
This. And this is why chasing exact tones from recordings is not a good idea, imho. What works within a specific mix is made to work FOR this mix. If you play in a cover band and want to have the exact guitar sound for each song you cover (from different bands), you'll be the FOH engineer worst nightmare.

Also the exact reason why I tend not to jive with preset packs.

I'll run and hide now. :D

(Expressed in good fun.)
 

North

Inspired
I still find it fascinating that some folks completely fill their User 1 bank and would be using User 2.

At eg. 1 minute average per IR audition time, one bank would be 17 or so hours of work, but then I would guess one would need to compare more than a few to find out what IRs go into ones actual/active presets. 1 minute may appear to be high, but including back and forth comparisons, maybe not. 🤷‍♂️

Another vote for User bank 2 released to FullRes here.
 
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giantslayer

Inspired
Don't forget that the isolated guitar tracks are often/usually/mostly post-mix. Meaning what is isolated is the sound after the engineer has worked his craft, chopping here, boosting there, etc. This has then little to do with the original tone of the guitar as it sounded coming out of the amp.
Another thing to consider is that a studio engineer is going to be a lot more heavy-handed with the EQ and compression than a live sound engineer.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
Well, it's not that difficult - you just copy stuff there.

Using everything that you copied - that's the tricky part.
Weeding out those you aren't using and defragging the remaining space while updating all the presets using the defrag-affected IRs is my pain point. It's a job which should replace a human with a small shell script....
 

yyz67

Power User
@Admin M@ , @FractalAudio
Yes. The two IR Player blocks have been combined into a single, stereo IR Player block with individual level and pan and a mix control.

I don't think this has been answered yet. Would this break my presets with two separate IRP blocks, especially two separate IRPs in series (e.g. cab IR -> TM IR)?
 
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Piing

Fractal Fanatic
What happens when you have a preset that references user cab 12, and you later replace user cab 1 with a Fullres IR (overwriting the space in IR slots 1 thru 32)? Just think of how this approach complicates things, and the additional work it would take to address those complexities.

Before applying the upgrade:
1) Use FracTool to list all the links between User CABs and User Presets in a Excel file
2) Highlight the CABS at User Bank 2 that are linked to a preset
3) Move them to Bank 1 and re-link the preset

Coming soon:
Use the Axe-Edit "Save Preset + CAB bundle" feature to save you presets together with the CABs
 

bdrepko

Fractal Fanatic
While this argument is totally valid and understandable, you ARE connected and working with a computer when recording, right? And if you are, there's not much difference in workflow whether your IRs are stored on the computer or on the device itself. And if you're not recording, why would you change those IRs at all?
You completely miss the point that you may be at a gig and need to build 80 presets between soundcheck and your first set. :cool:
 
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