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“Jesus, is there anything you people don’t bitch about”

TG3K

Power User
🎶 Blackbird swingin' in the dead of night...
...take this 2x4 and learn to fly 🎤...

Except for the imminent and impending nuclear apocalypse we lived under
the specter of. ;)

Cold War kids knew the bomb drills---as if they would have ever
kept us safe.
Growing up in the '60s in Los Alamos NM (as I did) was interesting to say the least. There were some Civil Defense fallout shelters around town, but we didn't even bother with bomb drills in school. Los Alamos was near the top of the Soviet's target list, and everyone knew we'd all be toast no matter how many desks we hid under.
 

David Tesch

Member
Back to the whole playing in a box issue... If you save the Styrofoam packing that surrounds appliances they make a great snow fort via the Empire Strikes Back for your Star Wars action figures. I still have many of the original toys.
 

USMC_Trev

Fractal Fanatic
it really wouldn’t surprise me if Cliff wonders if his hard work is all worthwhile.
Smart people like Cliff know that the people who take the time to bitch are the internet's screeching, annoying, shouting at clouds vocal minority, who represent less than one tenth of one percent of actual sentiment.
 

USMC_Trev

Fractal Fanatic
I remember one of the best "toys" we ever got was the huge cardboard box the refrigerator came in. We spent hours in that thing pretending it was a spaceship.
iu
 

Ben Randolph

Power User
If you want cabs that are more accurate than accurate, just get an external power amp and run into a real guitar cab. It'd be nice to have FullRes on the gen 1, but if Cliff says it's not possible it's not possible. I'd rather Fractal push the envelope than artificially hold back advancement for backwards compatibility.
 

sprint

Fractal Fanatic
if Cliff says it's not possible it's not possible.
Fractal has subsequently said it might be possible > https://forum.fractalaudio.com/threads/axe-fx-iii-mark-ii-turbo.177098/post-2154977

I'd rather Fractal push the envelope than artificially hold back advancement for backwards compatibility.
If reasonably possible, I'd rather they did both - not sure the mk1 is quite relegated to the backward compatibility todo list just yet.
 
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sprint

Fractal Fanatic
He was talking about factory cabs though
Yes, the question he answered referred to factory, so his answer would seem to point that way though there is a hair of ambiguity - I'd prefer in a user slot, but factory would be good too - this loading up Fullres cabs every power cycle is for the birds, I'd bet he is not at all satisfied with that as a workaround on mk1. I have not fallen totally head over heels over fullrez just yet so whatever..
 
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skunc

Experienced
It's society today. We're all spoiled. We want instant gratification and we usually get it. When we don't get it we feel like we're being cheated.

I think society was better when life was harder. I grew up with nothing. Most of us did. I remember one of the best "toys" we ever got was the huge cardboard box the refrigerator came in. We spent hours in that thing pretending it was a spaceship. We would spend hours playing baseball with a worn out ball or walk along the railroad tracks looking for smushed pennies we left the day before. We didn't have any fancy electronics or social media or much of anything. We ate government issued cheese and powdered milk. And yet we were happy.

I really think social media was one of the worst things to happen to society. It had the power to be a useful tool but that power has been abused in the name of greed. People's brains are being rewired intentionally to addict them to it so they can generate more advertising revenue. People are accustomed to getting hundreds of little dopamine hits every day and it's made them irrational and demanding. Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey will go down in history as two of the most evil pricks the world has ever seen (Sheryl Sandberg will be right behind them at the gates of hell).
I was born in 1967. I grew up surrounded by corn fields. We had corn stalks to play with and had the time of our lives beating the crap out of one another with them as we ran as fast as we could through the fields. There were always games of "hedge apple" football. Saving up plastic milk cartons and watching my dad make a raft for us kids to ride in the fields during the spring run off. My parents had us convinced that if we behaved we could have mush for supper! What a treat!!! We didn't know what we didn't have and we were better off for it. I suppose that might be the single most damaging aspect of social networking for young people and people alike. Constantly seeing what other people have and believing (by being sold told to us by social medial) it is a better life. Social media is creating adult children that resent and blame their parents for everything they don't have. These adult children often want nothing to do with their parents. They cut their parents out of their lives because their parents somehow prevented and limited them from achieving what they see on social media as the status quo. The adult children have been cheated by everyone and are somehow not responsible for any aspect of their own individual lives. The government, the establishment, the rich, the patriarchy, the majority the minority, are all colluding with their parents to make sure they suffer indefinitely. They feel powerless and have nothing to lose by following social norms of behavior. This gave rise to the bizarre amount of public tantrums and constant bitching about everything we all see and laugh about today.
 
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